Creating animated gifs in Ubuntu

Something that I do for a lot of my posts is create animated gifs, and usually I forget the whole process and have to re-look up everything. So here I will consolidate the process. There are four steps: 1) record video; 2) convert to images; 3) trim down image set; 4) convert to gif.

First, I’ve had luck recording the original video using the SimpleScreenRecorder program. Installation instructions are on their homepage, it’s very simple. I had been using RecordMyDesktop and tried Kazam, but prefer SimpleScreenRecorder.
Once you have your video, create a folder to store all your images in.
I called mine ‘images’.

To convert the video to a set of images we’ll need mplayer. In linux to install this it’s just

sudo apt-get install mplayer2

Once you have mplayer installed, change directories into your images folder and run

mplayer -ao _ ../movie_name.mp4 -vo png:z=9

This will fill up the folder with a bunch of screenshots from the video.

At this point you can go ahead and convert these images into an animated gif, but I always trim down the set to reduce the gif size. This just entails me going through and deleting every other image until I get a file that’s less than a megabyte. Once you’ve got the image set that you want to convert, you’re going to need ImageMagick installed. If you don’t have it, just run

sudo apt-get install imagemagick

Once you have that you’re going to use the convert function:

convert -delay 10 -loop 0 -deconstruct -quantize transparent -layers optimize -resize 400x400 *.png animation.gif 

with a bunch of extra options attached to control the play speed (that’s the delay parameter), the looping, some optimization parameters, and then what size it comes out (I’ve chosen 400×400 pixels here).

And there you go! You can now create your own fancy gifs.

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One thought on “Creating animated gifs in Ubuntu

  1. […] A quick aside: if you want to run this code yourself, get a real good computer, have an arm simulation ready, the hessianfree Python library installed, and the download and run this train_hf.py file. This will start training and save the weights into a weights/ folder, so make sure that that exists in the same folder as train_hf.py. If you want to view the results of the training at any point run the plot_error.py file, which will load in the most recent version of the weights and plot the error so far. If you want to generate an animated plot like I have below run gen_animation_plots.py and then the last command from my post on generating animated gifs. […]

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